Step Three: Correction Plan For Misbehavior – Part 1

This is step three in my summer goal to create a comprehensive classroom management plan.

Yes, I know, I’m running out of summer. It’s okay. I’ve got this. (please help)

This is probably the hardest step for me. The reason this is “part 1” is that I will only be covering consequences for my classroom rules. I will need a part 2 for consequences for violating other rules and regulations. And there’s so much literature on the subject, it’s hard to fit all my ideas from them in one post. A large part of my knowledge is coming from the “CHAMPS” book that I have, but I will also be pulling from “The First Days of School” by Harry & Rosemary Wong.

The first thing I think I should do is assign specific consequences to my 6 classroom rules:

  1. Always try.
  2. Compliment and encourage yourself and others.
  3. Listen to listen, not to respond.
  4. Keep track of missed work.
  5. Be prepared for class before the bell rings.
  6. Pick up supplies only when needed, use appropriately, and put away when done.

Rule 1: Always try. I am going to be implementing Standards Based Grading in my classes this year (ideally). This means that if the students don’t try, they don’t get credit. Trying and showing that they have learned a concept will be how they get their grade. Without doing so, they cannot improve their grade. I can simply remind them of this fact. If it becomes too much of a habit I will start keeping a record with infraction cards, an improvement plan, and followed by a parent conference (either on the phone or in person).

Rule 2: Compliment and encourage yourself and others. Obviously, I can’t really enforce them doing this specifically, but I can give them infractions if they discourage or insult themselves or others. And I will. I am thinking a combination of restitution and positive practice. The student will have to first apologize to the person he or she insulted or discouraged and then practice saying something positive instead. If the student refuses, it will be a write-up, a call home, and s/he will have to sign a slip of paper stating s/he said something rude and refused to correct the behavior. This two-step process may have to be separated so the student has time to calm down between the insincere apology and the fake compliment.

Rule 3: Listen to listen, not to respond. The best way I know this rule has been broken is if a student interrupts either me or another student. I can’t always catch it, but I can try. I think the best consequence for this would be time owed. By interrupting someone, even if it is immediately caught and the person is allowed to continue, time is wasted by the interruption, correction, and thought to recall where the conversation broke off and what was next. I would guess about 10 to 15 seconds. This means every time it happens, the student would owe 10 seconds after class. I know it doesn’t seem like much, but for a teenager who is waiting to gain access to his/her phone and see his/her friends, it can be. My biggest issue would be keeping up with it. Teenagers forget things quicker than I do, so I don’t really expect them to remember either. I would need a system in place to keep a record and remind them at the end of class during my end-of-class report. Perhaps I can use $10 poker chips. I can hand them to students when they interrupt someone and they have to return them to me at the end of class once their time has been completed. If they try to pocket them and run out the door, it’s a write-up, a parent conference, and a signature acknowledging the infraction. This still means I need to record it somewhere. Probably on the clipboard I will have to carry around to keep track of their academic progress.

Rule 4: Keep track of missed work. This is also something that will directly affect their grade as a consequence. In addition to having a specific place for them to pick it up, I think I will also attach a half-slip that acknowledges they picked up the work and take responsibility for completing it on their own time. That should be signed and picked up by me that day. This will require me to keep track of when someone was absent and needs to pick up the work so I can go and get the slip from them. If they forget, I think a 10 second time infraction would be appropriate since they will be wasting 10 seconds of class time getting the work they should have gotten before class started.

Rule 5: Be prepared for class before the bell rings. This will mean having all materials on their desk and ready to go as well as having read the opening question and began thinking of a response. When a student is absent, it will also mean grabbing the work s/he missed and signing the acknowledgment slip. If a student has to get up to get their notebook or borrow a writing utensil, it’s another 10-second infraction. I am really going to have to have a good system down for these time infractions.

Rule 6: Pick up supplies only when needed, use appropriately, and put away when done. This rule is to teach responsibility while minimizing distractions and off-task behavior. It can also be potentially dangerous depending on what the supply is (a corrosive chemical, for example). Therefore it will start out with 10-second time infractions but will escalate to a behavior improvement report, then a parent conference if it continues, and finally an office referral if the behavior does not stop. This is a particularly important rule to me that I have a low tolerance for so I may need a way to keep track of how often it is violated per student so I can be consistent with escalating the consequences. Additionally, if they break something as a result of inappropriate use, they will get a call home and be asked to fix or replace the item (provided it something small like a pair of scissors and not a beaker). Unless, of course, it was a legitimate accident while they were trying to handle the material appropriately.

Other rules and regulations will exist that I will have to have consequences for. CHAMPS (rules/guidelines) for specific activities, breaking school-wide rules, having their phone, not participating, lab rules, etc. Those will be in my next post.

For now, I need something other than a poker chip (something more difficult to slide into a pocket) to use for the time infractions, pre-written slips for students to sign based on different types of misconduct, a behavior correction plan outline/form, and a system for keeping up with it all. Please share any and all suggestions for these items.

I would love your opinion on this discipline plan. It’s my first one (though my 2nd year of teaching). What ideas for improvement do you have? What do you see not working or being difficult to implement and why?

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Step Two: Classroom Rules

This is step two in my summer goal to create a comprehensive classroom management plan.

Something I never thought I would have to say as a high school teacher: “Stop playing with the scissors/glue.” Yikes. Other things I had to say a lot were, “get off your cell phone,” “stop talking,” and “pay attention.” All of which would fall under ‘off-task behaviors.’ I had students drawing and writing and playing games and doing work for other classes. All of which comes down to them being off-task. I suppose I never thought I needed to communicate the expectation of being on-task because they are high schoolers and should know better. These are teens who are close to adulthood, so I had the idea to treat them like adults. I should not have done this. They have no idea how to be adults. My goal should be to teach them how to be adults.

The first step is to think of traits I value in others. Then possibly get more specific and turn the traits into a guideline for success. Last is to identify a behavior – what does that trait look like to me – and turn that behavior into a rule.

I value when others are respectful. More specifically, I want my students to have mutual respect and understanding with each other. To me, that means complimenting and encouraging others, no matter what. It also means when someone else is talking, it’s important to “listen to listen, not to respond.”

I value when others are patient. Not just with others, but when themselves too. To me, this looks like saying things like “I can do this,” and “I will get there,” when starting to feel discouraged. A simpler rule might be “Always Try,” instead of getting so lengthy with the rule. I’ll have to get input on this one.

I value when others are open-minded. In the classroom, I specifically value students being open-minded about what they learn, how they learn, and how others learn. This looks like changing your thinking based on learning new information. It also means researching something on your own that you’re not sure about. It means understanding that others learn differently from you and that doesn’t make them wrong.

I value a sense of responsibility. Not just with work, but also with improving yourself. Being responsible in the classroom looks like keeping up with missed work and being prepared for class before the bell. Which means having all materials on your desk and ready to work. It also means you only pick up supplies when using them and put them away when done. As in, don’t play with the glue, just use it and then put it away. Self-improvement in the classroom means staying persistent when you don’t understand something the first time.

I value when people are focused. Specifically, I think successful people are able to be focused on where they are and what they are doing. This looks like putting away distractions, such as cell phones. Since I will have a policy for where to put phones that will be part of a routine, I don’t think I need to list it as a rule. This will keep my list of rules shorter for students to remember. Listen to listen and not to respond also falls under staying focused.

  1. Listen to listen, not to respond.
  2. Always try
  3. Compliment and encourage yourself and others daily.
  4. Keep track of missed work.
  5. Be prepared for class before the bell rings.
  6. Pick up supplies only when needed and put away when done.

Notice that none of these specific behaviors are negative – as in none of them say “No __________.” I won’t say “no cellphones” as a rule, I’ll say “put cellphones away.” I won’t say “don’t insult one another,” I’ll say “compliment and encourage others.” It’s important to me that my rules be in a positive tone instead of a negative one. Easier to catch flies with honey than with vinegar and whatnot. I want to promote a positive and encouraging atmosphere, and that starts with the rules I set.

What are some traits that you value in others?

What does that look like?

What is one (or more) of your personal guidelines for success?

I would love to read any thoughts, inputs, or reflections that you have on positive traits, what helps a person be successful, and what rules help promote those traits. I would also love feedback on the rules I have drafted here.

Parents, what rules do you want to be enforced in the classroom?

Teachers, what rules do you have in place that have worked well for you?